About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

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NEXT EVENT: July 30, 2015

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Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

Google Insights

Wednesday
Jul292015

The Science Behind Creating Buyer Personas

The Science Behind Creating Buyer Personas infographic

The Science Behind Creating Buyer Personas infographic from WSI does a good job explaining why personas are way more than just demographic information. Too many companies don't dig deep enough when creating buyer personas to really understand their customers' decision making process.

A buyer persona can be one of the most powerful tools in helping you devise effective marketing strategies.

Wikipedia defines a buyer persona as “fictional characters created to represent the different user types that might use a site, brand, or product in a similar way.”

The process and resulting personas are particularly useful for businesses who recognize the value of content-marketing. The secret of content marketing is hiding in plain site: if you want your business to be found by prospective clients, referred by existing clients, lauded by critics, you need to start by creating great content that they will want to read.

Personas are a great foundation to identify the topics that are of interest, and the voice you should use to communicate them.

This infographic is a fun way of looking at how to go about this process. It isn’t easy, but it is extraordinarily valuable!

Sometimes infographics tell stories about concepts or processes instead of large data sets or statistics. This one uses icons and illustrations to help marketers understand how complicated building buyer personas can be.

Oddly, the infographic appears to be hosted on the MarketingProfs website instead of WSI. I couldn't find an original infographic landing page from WSI.

Wednesday
Jul292015

A History of Cell Phones and Cellphone Technology

A History of Cell Phones and Cellphone Technology infographic

Cellphone Technology has come a long way since the 80's. A History of Cell Phones and Cellphone Technology infographic from Lyca Mobile covers each generation of Cell Phones and adds some fun facts along the way. How many different generations have you owned?

This infographic covers the history of cell phones and cellphone technology from the 1st generation of cell phones in the 80’s to current high-speed 4G networks. 

There has been a lot of different cellphones since the 1980's; however, the infographic chose to separate the cellphones by broadband generations and then use just one easy to recognize cellphone from the time period. I also like how they stacked the uses for the cellphones. It was easy to recognize which features were new.

This design is purely informative. There's no call-to-action or asking the reader to do something with this information. However, they should have included the URL back to the infographic landing page so readers can find the full-size original design we people repost without the backlink to the Lyca website.

Thanks to David for sending in the link!

Tuesday
Jul282015

Largest Company by Revenue in Each State 2015

Largest Company by Revenue in Each State 2015 map

The Largest Company by Revenue in Each State 2015 map was created by Broadview Networks by using Hoover’s, a D&B Company's data. Even though there might be "bigger" companies in each state than the ones represented, the map is specifically looking at the greatest amount of revenue from the 2015 financial year.

You may have seen the Largest Companies by Revenue map we put together in June of last year, well we’re back with an updated version using Hoover’s 2015 data.  Last year’s map created so much buzz and insightful conversation that we deemed it essential to find out how it’s changed over the past year.  Using Hoover’s, a D&B Company, we searched through each state’s list of companies to find which had the largest revenue in the last fiscal year.  It was interesting to see how each company’s revenues have changed over the year (for better or worse) and to see if a new largest company had emerged.

At first glance, you may ask, “Where are Apple and Microsoft?”  Yes, these are huge companies but this map is specifically looking at total revenue from the last fiscal year.  If we look at California with Apple vs. Chevron, there is a large discrepancy between market value and total revenues.  Apple’s market value as of March 31, 2015 was $724 billion while Chevron’s was only (and we use “only” lightly) $197 billion.  In terms of revenue, Chevron comes out on top with $203 billion in the last fiscal year while Apple had revenues of $182 billion.

Please note: We used Hoover’s company database as our source, not the most recent Fortune 500 list.  Location and state are based on the corporate headquarters of that company, no branches or foreign offices.  Lastly, we decided not to include any subsidiaries or government entities for the sake of staying consistent.

I liked how they didn't manipulate the US map. Manipulation would have taken the focus away from the company's logos. If you click on the infographic, the original allows you to zoom in close enough to comfortably see small states, like CVS is Rhode Island's largest company of 2015. This infographic could of easily been overworked but instead they kept it simple.

The company post inspired a lot of discussion about the data, and I think that was part of the purpose behind the design. Is this the best data to show? Where are some of the more recognizable companies? There's even at least one error in the map.

Found on Broadview Networks VoIP Blog

Monday
Jul272015

Robert Scoble's 22 Tips for Improving Your Facebook Feed

Robert Scoble's 22 Tips for Improving Your Facebook Feed infographic

Robert Scoble's 22 Tips for Improving Your Facebook Feed infographic from Joel Comm is a great summary of making your own Facebook feed useful. We all lead busy lives, but sometimes it's worth stepping back and making sure your tools are working for you the best way they can.

A few weeks ago, Robert Scoble published 22 tips for making your facebook feed better. It was some of the best, time-tested content I had read on the subject. I was so impressed that I created an infographic in order to spread his tips. With Scoble's permission, here are his 22 tips. Be sure to go to his page and show him some love! And, of course, would love for you to share this with others.

This is essentially a list infographic that includes some icons to add visual content. I'm generally opposed to a lot of text in an infographic design, but the content here is so valuable that the descriptions are necessary in the design. Sharing as an infographic image file, also makes the content easier to share online.

The footer should include the link to the infographic landing page so readers can easily find the original, full-size version when people repost the infographic without a backlink to the original.

Monday
Jul202015

Beautiful Map Posters of Anywhere

Mapiful custom map posters

Mapiful is a great site that lets us choose the location and customize a beautiful black & white poster of any location in the world based on OpenStreetMap data. You can change the location, the zoom level, the label text, the orientation, and choose from a handful of clean layout styles.

The printed posters are a flat cost of $60 with free shipping worldwide.

Regardless of where you live and what city, country or spot you wish to eternalize - Mapiful takes you there. We bring people's favorite places to their homes. The city you were born, where you fell in love or just a place that makes your heart skip a beat. Search, zoom and tweak. Within days your unique Mapiful print will arrive in the mail.

Found on FlowingData and Visual News

Tuesday
Jul142015

Pro Tips to Track Results from Infographics

Creating an infographic is no simple task. A lot of time and resources go into the data research and design of a good infographic, but not always into figuring what happened after publishing it on the Internet. Where many companies miss the mark with their infographics is in their tracking efforts after the infographic has been released. Pageviews, social shares, reposts, backlinks, and more are all part of measuring the success of an infographic.

It is important to understand that infographics need as much promotional and tracking support as articles, videos, advertisements, and even the products and services their business is marketing. Learning what works and doesn’t work should be a huge part of future marketing plans.

The work of tracking an infographic starts the day it’s published online. Here are five key areas a company should focus on after they've released an infographic.

 

1. Dedicated Landing Page for Analytics

 

via: CopyBlogger

To make sure you get the most out of your infographic, make sure it is published on the company’s website on a dedicated landing page or if that’s not available, in it’s own blog post. That will provide a dedicated landing page URL as the one primary link in posts to drive all the views and backlinks to one place. By creating a landing page you can access your own web analytics to see pageviews, traffic patterns and referring sites. You also have control over which social sharing buttons to include for default text and sharing statistics.

An often overlooked ally to tracking infographics after their release is your company’s own website analytics. When you examine the metrics of the overall company website, inbound links can become a jackpot for insights about who picked up your content.

Pro Tip:

Use inbound links to keep track of pick-up, and target new outlets for future outreach efforts.

An alternate (or secondary) method would be to publish your infographic on a hosted platform like Visme or SlideShare. These platforms display the infographic within an enclosure that can be embedded and shared on other sites, and gather the analytics from all of the sites displaying the enclosure in one tracking report.


 

2. Track the Value of Backlinks

 

via: Pole Position Marketing

For many companies, the goal of publishing infographics is to attract links and visitors to its own website. To find all of those links, you have to go looking for them.

Pro Tip:

Use an SEO backlink tool like Majestic SEO Site Explorer, Moz Open Site Explorer, or even do a Google search of the full landing page URL (another advantage of having a dedicated landing page URL). These tools will allow you to be able to find all of those valuable backlinks.

Be sure to check the value of links from those sites. One strong link can be worth more than many weak links. Google call this PageRank, Moz calls this Authority, and Majestic calls this Trust. Choose one metric for your tracking so you are comparing the same type of score across all of the sites that link to your infographic landing page.

Go through your list of industry specific websites, blogs, and news media outlets you pitched the infographic to, and search their website to see if anything pops up (wait about a week or two before searching to give time for an article to be written).

 

3. Social Share Counters

 

Social media can be used as a good indicator of how well your content is performing online, especially when looking at social shares from a specific media site pick-up. It’s important to remember that social sharing doesn’t help your own website’s pagerank, but it does build widespread awareness and exposure of your infographic content.

Pro Tips:

a. Use the counters from the social share buttons you set-up on the dedicated landing page.

b. Search Twitter (and other social media sites) for the full URL link to the landing page to find other social media posts that didn’t use your buttons but did link back to the infographic.

c. Check the social share button counters on other sites that reposted the infographic for additional sharing stats.


4. Reverse Image Search

 

When a blogger, media outlet, or journalist has chosen to write about your infographic, it doesn't always mean they will also take the time to include a link back to your website, or will even remember where they found the infographic. Reverse Image Search is a valuable tool to use to find reposts of your infographic that don’t link back to your website..

Reverse Image Search is a service offered by Google, Bing and TinEye. They allow you to drag and drop, upload your own image or choose an image online to start the search. The results will list all of the web pages in their index that include that image, in any size. This is the best way to find sites that posted your infographic without linking back to your landing page.

Via: Google Images

Pro Tip:

Reach out to any high value sites you find that published your infographic but didn’t include a link. Politely thank them for sharing your infographics, and ask them to add a link back to the original landing page.

 

5. Gather Your Results

Pull together all of the results you found into a summary that your company can use as a benchmark to evaluate future published content. Your web analytics, combined social shares, backlinks from sites and image-only posts together paint an overall picture of how well your infographic performed.

via: Razor Social

Pro Tip:

Site that have seen their own success from posting your infographic are more likely to post future infographics from you as well. Start building an outreach list of people and sites that appreciate your content.

 

Even the slightest effort put into tracking your infographic can significantly improve your understanding of the value of visual content. In order to understand it’s value, you have to understand its reach. Then, you can evaluate how your content is performing, and make any changes needed to make future content more likely to garner the pick-up and exposure your team or company seeks.

Remember, you can’t improve what you don’t measure!

Are there any other tracking methods you use to keep track of your infographics or other visual content? How do you measure success for infographic (or any visual content)?

Monday
Jul132015

Infographics at SxSW V2V in Las Vegas

Next week on Monday, July 20th I'll be hosting a Mentor Session at the SxSW V2V conference in Las Vegas! The goal of the mentor program is to help conference attendees benefit from the knowledge of an established professionals in a one-on-one career counsel setting.  Mentor sessions are essentially individual Ask Me Anything consulting sessions where it's first come - first serve to talk about infographics, data visualization, business plans, presentations, marketing strategies, visual content, SEO or just running a small startup business.

Infographics Meetup! Additionally, on Tuesday, July 21st at 8-9pm I'll be hosting a DataViz and Infographics social meetup at the Lily Bar in the Bellagio. This will be a great opportunity to grab a drink and chat all things design, data, and of course infographics. Even if you're not attending the SxSW conference, come join me!

Send me a note on Twitter @rtkrum if you'll be at the SxSW V2V event, or just want to meet in Las Vegas!

Monday
Jul132015

A Brief History of Open Source Code

A Brief History of Open Source Code infographic

Learn about the last 20 years of collaborative software development, language relationships, and the current state of the art with A Brief History of Open Source Code infographic. Kinvey, a company that helps its clients create mobile apps, published the infographic designed by Beutler Ink back in 2013. For more in-depth reading, check out this article at Read Write.

We were able to visualize the percentage of total commits in a given quarter for the top 16 programming languages from 1993 until today. We hope you’ll find this image—a provocative pattern of dips and spikes—to be as interesting as we do. It truly shows how dynamic the world of programming is. We’ve also included a few graphs on other interesting data points: total number of languages by year, average lines of code per commit, and tracking which languages influenced the development of others.

There is good use of colors and charts to tell the story of the 16 different source code languages. No numbers were needed to show the popularity of each language, only distances between the colors. The colors are similar, but not to the point where we would have trouble telling them apart. I like the gradual color gradient in the infographic. Too many different colors would make the graphic look too busy.  

Found on http://readwrite.com

Thursday
Jul092015

How to Pick Your First Programming Language

How to Pick Your First Programming Language infographic

Udacity presents, How to Pick Your First Programming Language infographic. Your decision depends a lot on where and the job you are aiming for. Check out the graphic for some tips.

If you haven’t picked your first programming language, the programming world is your oyster. Yet with evangelists for every language telling you their language is the best, choosing one to start with can be incredibly overwhelming. We’ve looked at the data for the top ten programming languages in the US (based on IEEE Spectrum data) to help you pick the best language to start with based on your priorities in lifestyle, location, and career potential.

Python is a popular, well-paid language, being versatile enough to be used in many different applications, while Javascript is used widely across the country, and can be a good choice if you don’t want to relocate for a job. Although some newer programming languages, such as Swift, are not included, you shouldn’t discount the growth of their popularity. Career opportunities in iOS development using Swift, similar to Android development using Java, will increase as the field of mobile app development continues to expand.

There are many factors involved in choosing your first programming language. This data can help you figure out what works for you.

Good rundown of the stats behind the programming language careers. I'm not sure that Google searches in the best gauge of language popularity. Maybe something like number of projects on GitHub might have worked better.

The footer should include the URL back to the original infographic landing page, not just the main front page for Udacity.

Thanks to Lindsay for sending in the link!

Thursday
Jun252015

Business Etiquette Around the World

Business Etiquette Around the World infographic

When you are on a business trip, making a good impression is always key, but meeting internationally for business can make things a little tricky. The Business Etiquette Around the World infographic from CT Business Travel has compiled a list of expectations for those meeting in foreign countries around the world. As the infographic states, "Follow these tips and never put a hand, fork, or word out of place again."

Customs and etiquette vary wildly from country to country, and business professionals are often unaware of the differences.

This made us think, wouldn’t it be really useful to research and produce an illustrative guide that provides an easy to digest overview of the essential cultural differences for when professionals meet international clients, suppliers and colleagues overseas – so we did and here it is.

For instance the French prefer to shake hands lightly, as do the Japanese and South Koreans, and pre-business chit-chat may be customary in Brazil, but this is not the case in Russia, Switzerland and a number of other countries.

The following Infographic outlines the rules that can be unwittingly broken across the world and will be of interest to anyone who wants to seal the deal rather than tarnish their reputation.

Table data like this is always a challenge to visualize. Using icons in the table format is a good way to make the data easier to understand and compare between rows.

Thanks to Danny for posting the link on Linkedin!